64.5 F
Springville
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Support our Community Sponsors

Public invited to handcart presentation by historian

Avatar
Chris Bairdhttp://www.servedaily.com
Chris is a family man with a beautiful wife and four kids. Three Girls, One Boy. He enjoys playing basketball, being outdoors, and the old normal.

More from Author

Serve Daily: August 2020

Enjoy the 99th issue of Serve Daily. This issue is full of great articles by local Utah County writers and made possible...

Every day can be a better day, despite the challenge

Life is full of challenges. We knew that last year and we know that now. Life, at any time, has at least...

Giveaways: Summer Giveaway

Click to View our Sponsors Websites

Mapleton youth wins Arbor Day tree poster contest

Emma Beach, a fourth-grader at Mapleton Elementary, recently won the Sweepstakes Award for the Utah Arbor Day Tree Poster Contest. 

r

Handcart travel the way it was done in 1856 to 1860 is the theme of an upcoming lecture sponsored by the Springville Senior Citizens.

r

- Advertisement -

It will be held Wednesday Aug. 3, at 6 p.m. at the Senior Center, 65 E. 200 South, Springville. This event is free and the public is invited.

r

The handcart experience catches the hearts and imaginations of many who have ancestors who came west by that unique mode of travel. Even for those with no family or religious ties to those pioneers, the idea of immigrants taking scant provisions so they could push and pull handcarts across the plains to begin a new life in what they believed was Zion is intriguing.

r

Lyndia Carter, an avid historical researcher, writer and lecturer, will take her audience along that long and difficult trip to Utah using the participants’ own words to piece together the day-to-day drama and drudgery of the handcart era.

r

Traveling on foot was not unique to the Mormon handcart immigrant experience. Nearly everyone heading westward except for the young, elderly and ill walked most if not all the distance to Oregon, California, Utah and other areas. The exertion of pulling and pushing a handcart was exhausting labor compounded by a lack of supplies, inadequate clothing, extreme heat, storms and horrendous cold. Certainly, in Carter’s opinion, they went the hard way. It was inexpensive, but it was the only way they could afford to “gather to Zion.” They paid the price with effort and perseverance.

r

This method of transportation, lasting three years, involved only about 3,000, or 5 percent, of the 60,000 Mormons who migrated to Utah between 1847 and 1869 before the building of the transcontinental railroad. About 2,000 came in 1856, the first year this transportation method was used. The remainder coming in 1857, 1859 and 1860 (none in 1858). Carter is a stickler for historical accuracy, and the handcart pioneers’ real, factual stories in their own words and without embellishment are captivating.

r

Lyndia McDowell Carter is a former Utah history and English teacher. She is deeply involved in several historical organizations and keeps active studying history and doing research and writing as well as speaking basically on a full-time basis. She has written a number of articles for various publications and is currently working on manuscripts for a few books on the handcart pioneers. She has been a consultant for and has appeared in several TV documentaries on overland migration, Utah history and the handcart story.

- Advertisement -
Avatar
Chris Bairdhttp://www.servedaily.com
Chris is a family man with a beautiful wife and four kids. Three Girls, One Boy. He enjoys playing basketball, being outdoors, and the old normal.

More from Author

Serve Daily: August 2020

Enjoy the 99th issue of Serve Daily. This issue is full of great articles by local Utah County writers and made possible...

Every day can be a better day, despite the challenge

Life is full of challenges. We knew that last year and we know that now. Life, at any time, has at least...

Giveaways: Summer Giveaway

Click to View our Sponsors Websites

Mapleton youth wins Arbor Day tree poster contest

Emma Beach, a fourth-grader at Mapleton Elementary, recently won the Sweepstakes Award for the Utah Arbor Day Tree Poster Contest. 
Our Print Advertisers

More in Category

Time to get your try on

Many say this is a year that should just be cancelled, however, I believe this is a year that can be used...

National Parks Week may be impacted by events in the world

By proclamation of President Donald J. Trump, on April 20, our nation celebrates National Park Week with fee free entrance and a variety of special programs. This year National Park Week

College graduate realizes dream of sharing wonders of ocean with people of the desert

Serve Daily is about positive and uplifting people, organizations, and events. Occasionally while working on one story we find another amazing story behind the first story.

Viewpoint Frozen-Frozen: Coming to the Defense of Hans

I watched Frozen II recently, and honestly, I was disappointed. The makers of Frozen II promised the audience a redemption arc of Hans, the good guy who turned out to be the villain in the